Friday, February 19, 2010

February Seedlings - Part II

I thought I'd do a another quick post on how things are progressing so far. Enjoy!

red scallions and onions
The Red of Florence scallions and Red Amposta onions are getting taller by the day.

Tuscan kale
The Tuscan kale have grown their first set of true leaves.

Shanghai Pac Choi and Mizuna 2
The Shanghai bok choy and Mizuna will be ready for transplanting in a couple of weeks.

wild strawberries
The wild strawberries are growing slowly but surely. I have at least 24 blocks of Yellow Wonder and 17 blocks of Red Wonder.

thyme
The thyme has germinated in 6 days time.

ground cherry
The ground cherries are sprouting very slowly, but the germination rate looks pretty good. I should have about 10 transplants when all is said and done.

roselle
Only 2 out of 5 soil blocks containing roselle went on to germinate. The rest have rotted. I am currently pre-sprouting a couple more seeds.

Celery
The celery seedlings really need to be thinned. They look so delicate; I can't bring myself to do it yet.

Imperial Star artichoke
One of 2 Imperial Star artichokes I got from my first sowing is finally starting to develop its first set of true leaves.

Imperial star artichokes
Finally, 8 seeds from my second sowing of artichokes have germinated. It looks like I'm in business again!

This weekend is supposed to be a very busy one on my seed starting schedule. Hopefully, I'll be able to get everything done.

18 comments:

  1. Oh, my...everything just looks great! I think you have the magic touch, Thomas.

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  2. The youngsters are coming along under your good care! Well done. :D

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  3. My! You'll be busy for days! Good luck transplanting them all, Thomas!

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  4. Aw man....you've got all kinds of stuff sprouting! Oh, I know you're enjoying this propagation stuff so much....

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  5. Oh Thomas! They look so good! So glad the artichokes finally germinated.

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  6. Wow Thomas. You are way ahead! I directly sowed some carrots, onions, radishes and spinach and am soaking a few beans (for blocks) and peas. Your seedlings look quite happy.

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  7. Your seedlings look wonderful! I will admit mine are PATHETIC! Most were herbs and after 20 days I was ready to toss the whole lot of them, but last night I noticed that 3 cells have finally peeked up, I will give them a few more days. I hate this 20-25 day germination stuff, I'm ready for my speedy tomatoes! My scallions didn't sprout, it's old seed so I think they are kaput. With all the remodeling, I was busy and haven't done another sowing, but I think I will try a few again this week now that the dust has (literally) settled. Thanks for your pictures, they have inspired me to dive back in to my seed flats!

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  8. Very exciting! I'm glad the artichokes worked out. Have you ever tried purple spinach?

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  9. Your photographs are beautiful. Can you answer questions? I am new to seed starting. I believe your round starts are peat pellets -- what are the square starts? Did you make them yourself? Both options are stunning to look at -- do you go straight to ground with them? Or do your transplants outgrow their starts?

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  10. They all look so cute. Lovely photos.

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  11. Thomas, looks wonderful...great photographs too....

    i have never tried starting strawberries from seed..yours look so good... maybe i should give it a go....and i have to get an artichoke in..

    have a wonderful weekend, my friend

    kary

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  12. Fantastic! I'm planning on starting those Bok choy seeds tonight! I'm very excited about it.

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  13. Thanks for commenting everyone.

    Aerelonian - Purple spinach??? I've never heard of that. I will have to do some research. :)

    Leslie - Yes, the rounds are peat pellets. The square ones are soil blocks which you fashion using soil block makers. One of the benefits of soil blocks is that they air-prune the roots of your seedlings and therefore, the risk of transplant shock is much less. Depending on the veggie, I will either transplant directly or "pot up" (like tomatoes).

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  14. Apparently it has 3x the vitamin A of normal spinach. It's not really spinach, it's Orach. The variety I have is Purple Passion. Apparently it tastes very similar though.

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  15. I do enjoy looking at all these photos! Those onions do grow fast...

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  16. Your soil blocks look fabulous. So do all your little sprouts!

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  17. Everything looks great. Your light set up is doing wonders!

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