Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Fall Citrus

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Right about this time every year, the fruit on my potted citrus trees begin to ripen. As you can see, the Meyer lemons are slowly beginning to shed their green exterior. Unfortunately, I will only have 5 to harvest this time around, unlike the 20 that I picked last year. This is just enough for one batch of marmalade. We still have several jars left over from last year so I'm not too disappointed about it.

Sadly, my Kaffir lime tree did not set any fruit this year and my Seville orange tree has yet to produce its first crop.

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Of my two Mandarinquat trees, one has a handful of fruit. They are also beginning to change color. I'm really excited to try these for the first time. When it comes to growing potted citrus trees, patience is definitely a virtue. It will be several more years before they are mature enough to produce a good amount of fruit. Once they do, it will be fun to think of ways to cook and preserve them. I love candied citrus so candied mandarinquats will most likely be at the top of the list.

15 comments:

  1. LOVE LOVE LOVE marmelade...can't wait to see how it comes out (hint, please blog about it!).

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  2. Thomas - I'm wondering why you grow your citrus in pots? Is it because of the weather?

    Our local lemon is called the Eureka Lemon and is quite a prolific producer.

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  3. I get excited around this time of year. My kumquats and tangelos are about to produce their crops!! Can't wait to taste the fruit. Hope you they all form well for you:)

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  4. Lemon in pots? great idea...will try it in my container garden..:)

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  5. I am so excited for you I remember my first home grown orange I didn't wait untill it turned orange.

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  6. Congratulations on the fruit you did get!

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  7. Congrats on your first orange crop! I purchased my dwarf citrus trees this year. Hopefully I will have my first lemons next year.

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  8. I am drooling looking at your lovely crop. How do you over winter your citrus trees?

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  9. Love this time of year on your blog :)

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  10. Ugh. I've failed with citrus so many times!

    I thought kaffir lime was only grown for its aromatic leaves?

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  11. Please tell us more about the pots! I am thinking about a potted orchard, partly because we have a stupid climate ranging from frost to 30degC (86degF)so there's no ideal place to plant anything and also because we might move house again and I don't want to leave my orchard behind. I'd be very interested to hear about your reasons and your strategy (ie what potting mix you used and how you look after the trees) because you're obviously doing a good job if you're getting some fruit from them already. Cheers, Liz

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  12. I'll have to post pictures of my extremely large tree (compared to when I got it!) and the FLOWERS!

    Thomas, did you pollinate the flowers? The brochure says the lemons are self-pollinating.

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  13. I'm sad to say we had to leave our lemon tree in AZ for the new owner to enjoy. There just wasn't enough room to bring her home. Her two lemons were still green, so we didn't get to sample her first fruits :-(

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  14. These are mouth watering fruits in your garden. Hope you will be enjoying Your hard work and fruits of it.

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  15. These pictures of fruits are looking so yummy. You have a rich garden. People will like to see some more pictures.

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