Saturday, April 17, 2010

Chilies and Peppers Update

Chilies and Peppers
Here are some of the peppers and chilies I started back in early February. I heard that pepper seedlings tend to develop slowly but this is getting to be ridiculous. I thought they would be much further along by now. Part of me wishes that I'd put more thought into which varieties would be best suited to grow in our New England climate.

Chilies and Peppers 2
I'm not growing any traditionally sweet peppers this year. Instead my list includes Ancho/Poblano, Early Jalapeno, Pepperoncini, Hawaiian chili and Thai chili. As you can see above, the young leaves start out curled and then unfold as they mature. I'm wondering if this is part of their normal develop or if their growth is being stunted somehow. Maybe a little too much nitrogen? Hopefully your peppers and chilies are doing better than mine!

19 comments:

  1. Your plants are looking pretty good. As with any fertilizer, err on the side of less than more.
    One year, I bought a seedling that was marked as a 'chocolate' sweet pepper. Turned out to be an habenero! Our SIL loved them raw. I roasted them, removed the ribs and seeds and they sure added a great pepper flavor without the heat to any dish!

    Susan

    http://susan-chicdaisy.blogspot.com/

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  2. I bought pepper plants this year, because the y are kinda finicky - in my opinion. I think yours look good...

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  3. Your peppers are about the same size as mine also started in Feb. Once they get into the ground with more sun and heat they will grow a bit faster.

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  4. I started peppers on February 1st and most of them are about 10"-12" tall with flowers. They didn't grow so fast last year but I started them with bottom heat and left them on it until the seedlings were a week or two. I noticed that my chili peppers grow more slowly - my Filius Blue are only about 5".

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  5. They look just fine to me. I have started mine in late February and they are smaller than yours. Last year they were even smaller when I transplanted them to the garden and they produced plenty.
    They do look very good!

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  6. They look just like mine. That's why I start them so early. If I didn't, I wouldn't get any peppers at all.

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  7. they are beautiful! i'll bet once they are in the ground they'll stretch their little roots and flourish. patience...

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  8. I think your peppers are looking good! The hot ones seem to grow more slowly than sweet ones for me.

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  9. Yours look great! Mine always look like that every year, don't worry, they are slow and will really take off in June and get dark green and bushy. Mine are already in the beds, as little as they are!

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  10. The stunted curly growth looks like aphid damage.

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  11. Mine are much smaller at the moment. Peppers always give me fits with getting started. I am not planning to plant mine out until May so I did not start the seeds until late February. They are just getting started at this point and hopefully will ramp up the growth soon.

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  12. Your peppers look pretty good Thomas...My experience with many of the varieties you listed is that they are just slow growers at least in the first couple months...they generally start growing like crazy after that. The Ancho Pablanos have been the absolute slowest grower for me this year but now they are finally taking off.

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  13. My peppers have just germinated. I know I'm a person who likes smaller plants. Your biggest to me is a fine size to put out right now. Other like them bigger, but I think they produce better if they go out younger. Some year I ought to try it side by side to see if I'm right or not. Too late for that this year.

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  14. Anonymous - I suspected that the stunted leaves are the result of aphid damage too. I've been inspecting them daily for aphids. Hopefully, they are now gone for good!

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  15. Thomas, this weekend I put three scotch bonnets out in the victory garden that were just that size. My pepper transplants were definitely not larger last year, and they made a world of peppers by the end of summer. I think you don't need to worry! :)

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  16. They look like they have been a little to wet. Possible to large of a container this early on. I'd keep them warm, on the dry side and no food until they go outside. Once outside they really get growing.

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  17. I have limited experience here, but mine never seem to take off until the warmer months arrive, I often get great Fall peppers- they flower and fruit so well after a good dose of 'medium' summer heat. The problem I had last year was ripening time, I REALLY hope we have a better summer for gardening here in the Northeast.

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  18. I second Kelly! Last year I had copious amounts of jalapenos and bells harvested into October!

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  19. I agree with Dan, maybe a bit too wet. And aphid damage may be contributing as well. If it's not aphid damage the crinkly leaves might be fixed with a dose of bonemeal. Check out Redwood City Seed Company's website for their great pepper growing tips (they are the ones who recommend bonemeal for crinkly leaves).

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